This example illustrates how to diagram a compound sentence.  A compound sentence is made up of 2 or more independent clauses joined by a coordinating conjunction (and, or, nor, but, yet).  Note that one would diagram each independent clause as a separate sentence, and then the coordinating conjunction is placed between the two sentences.  The coordinating conjunction is written on a horizontal line between the two verbs.  (If a semicolon (;) is used in place of the coordinating conjunction, just place the semicolon (;) on the line.  (In some diagrams, the coordinating conjunction is placed between the two base lines before the subjects of the two sentences.) Ruth failed mathematics, but she passed English.


Back to Compound/Complex Sentences

Back to Diagramming Index